Crazy for the blonde: short film review

Crazy for the blonde

★★★★

Directed by: Mark Clauburg

Starring: Kristin Muri, Mike Funk, Alexandru Aldea

Short Film Review by: #StefaniaMihailescu

If a blonde and a brunette walk in together, people will look at the blonde first.

The human eye is attracted to things that are gold in color. The media also shows blonde people in an overwhelmingly positive light. Blonde in general is aesthetically pleasing. In general blondes are pedestalized by the media, and that influences what guys perceive as what is hot and what isn’t.

And sometimes if one can’t have her, will kidnap her.

Crazy for the blonde is about two serial killers that compete for the same victim, a blonde-haired woman who has plans of her own. They forget that when a sexy woman activates her seduction tricks there is little that a guy can offer in terms of resistance.

Just as women can be manipulative, men can also play a big part in this game, and be unaware of how they have actively put themselves in the position they are in. Psychological manipulation is afterall the exercise of undue influence through mental distortion and emotional exploitation, to seize power at the victim’s expense.

They’ll keep the blonde at any cost. The hope of freedom will keep her alive, their obsession will make her act with calm and be more focused of everything they do.

Criminal experts believe fantasy, obsession and the desire for control may drive to allegedly kidnap to control a woman and completely dominate her.

Every man wants to be a hero, and wise girls can pretend to be weak just to let the man feel like a superman. It could be sexual allure, the false promise of sex, the false promise of a sexual relationship.

Even though the film ends in an ironic and unexpected way, it’s really scary to think about being abducted or taken hostage, not knowing how you should handle the situation or keep calm.

Unfortunately here are a lot of violent, exploitative people willing to use and abuse their fellow human beings.  Women remain fragile victims rather than competent actors.