VINCENT: REVIEW

★★★★

Directed by: Gabriele Di Sazio

Starring: Dakota Kappen, Beau Garrett, James Oliver, Vincent Washington

Short Film Review by: #StefaniaMihailescu

Leaving home might be the best choice for all of us. Yet, the mind is jumping from overwhelming excitement to crippling anxiety all in the space of a few mere seconds. After days since the decision was taken, it still feels like we haven’t ’’packed’’ enough to prepare ourselves from a life away from home.

On his 21st birthday, Vincent gets persuaded to follow his friend Bunny to a brothel where he will meet a woman that looks like his mother.

Intimacy’s the real taboo in society – it’s the thing we fear, because it’s about taking off the mask that so many of us hide behind. Intimacy usually denotes mutual vulnerability, openness, and sharing.

Vincent is in his 20s.

He has the face of a teenager, as if his body did not want to grow up, as if he was stuck in a certain period of his life and could not move on. His journey in this film is one of hopeless wander – a pointless search for something that he can’t understand. He’s looking for a lost intimacy. He’s trying to to back home, but he doesn’t know that yet.

The feeling of home is like a warm blanket after a cold day of playing outside.

He went farther and farther, trying to find something that could represent a flame, a sort of reason, a hope, but growing up without his father increased his chances to be aggressive and quick to anger.

Quiet anger is more insidious and volatile. Silent anger doesn’t have a proper release valve, it just builds up like a growing monster, maturing right along with the host. Anger makes one think and act with stupidity, and that’s just a bad way to release energy. But life is full of possibilities, and reveales the fact that one can truly be whoever dreamed about.

All of us may not be a frequent flyer but we often need to leave  home for a reason. Flipping the coin, one day the trip comes to an end and we return back home. 

The director of the short underlines the idea of feeling disoriented and having a hard time focusing or making decisions. 

As confused and unsure as anyone may feel, there’s much more clarity than ever in the picture. Being lost in your own personal thought is what produces the feeling of confusion.

But are “you” actually confused?